PubTips Round-Up

Twitter can be very time consuming  to keep up with so I give you, #PubTips Round-up.

Since I know many do not follow Twitter I thought I’d give you another round-up of the most recent writing/publishing tips mentioned. If, by chance you decide to give Twitter a go, please send me an email so we can follow one another, I’m @I_am_Writing. Remember, you don’t have to tweet, just pop in every once in a while to check in. You never know what you’ll find.

(The @ symbol and the name that follows is the person who posted the tip or aka Tweeted the tip)

@WolfsonLiterary – When critique partners disagree http://bit.ly/hAyCVD

@SandraBeckwith – How to Plan Your Virtual Book Tour – terrific advice and sample pitch letter http://bit.ly/e0nafC

@I_am_Writing – Writers, never stop learning about the #pub biz; ISBN in and outs http://tinyurl.com/4pzno9h

@StacyAbramsEdit – If a fiction picture book is over 1,000 words, it’s way too long…Even 800+ is often cutting it close.

@meganrecords – …A grin parted her lips.” Overwriting. “She grinned” is just fine; I won’t think you are less creative

@EgmontGal – Don’t worry about sounding of-the-moment unless you are doing YA chick lit. References date so very quickly.

@louise_wise – If you are a writer or blogger you should know about tag clouds… http://t.co/ZhsrSbb

@dirtywhitecandy – Why an agent can judge your book from your query letter Janice Hard http://ht.ly/3SQAl

Contact me: iamwriting (at) oh(dot)rr(com)
p.s. To answer your question, Twitter did not pay me to do this post,  😀

Published in: on February 15, 2011 at 12:07 pm  Leave a Comment  

PubTips Round-Up

Twitter can be very time consuming  to keep up with so I give you, #PubTips Round-up.

#PubTips, for those not using Twitter, it is a hashtag (way to follow a conversation/discussion) and a great source of information for writers. Once you weed out the users who tweet,  “Oh, I died my hair blue today” and “I wish this cab would go faster” you can really learn a lot. If  your looking for people to chat with various topics, it’s great too, but I prefer to use it professionally. With that said, for me, some great new FRIENDships have come since joining. There are amazing people in the:

publishing biz:

@bredalot aka Breda Smith

@ChuckSambuchino aka Chuck Sambuchino

writers:

@ShellyPicarella aka Michelle A.Picarella

@kelcrocker aka Kellye Crocker

@RChazzChute aka Robert Chute

@tinatolerkeel aka Tina Toler-Keel

@kelseyketch aka Kelsey Ketch

@lakuehlke aka Laura Kuehlke

@ShoshannaEvers aka Shoshanna Evers

@ecmyers aka E.C. Myers

@CherylRWrites aka Cheryl Reifsnyder

@RavenRequiem13 aka Phillip Creighton

@Saint_Upid aka Chad Thomas Johnston

@nicolewolverton aka Nicole Wolverton

literary agents:

@louisefury aka Louise Fury

@johnmcusick aka John M Cusick

@LucyACarson aka Lucy Carson

@EvanJGregory aka Evan Gregory

@d4eo aka Bob Diforio

@wmclarkassoc aka William Clark

@ginapanettieri aka Gina Panettieri

@McVeighAgency aka The McVeigh Agency

@breeogden aka Bree Ogden

editors:

@martyhalpern aka Marty Halpern

@sarahshum aka Sarah Shumway Liu

@lindseyfaber aka Lindsey Faber

@NRP_Submissions aka Julia Daniels

@Mitch_Hoffman aka Mitch Hoffman

@slushpilehorror aka Anon Editors

and publishers:

@TyrusBooks aka Tyrus Books

@SimonBooks aka Simon&Schuster Books

who are willing to give expert advice and they do so everyday on Twitter.

Since I know many do not follow Twitter I thought I’d give you a round-up of the most recent writing/publishing tips mentioned. If, by chance you decide to give Twitter a go, please send me an email so we can follow one another, I’m @I_am_Writing. Remember, you don’t have to tweet, just pop in every once in a while to check in. You never know what you’ll find.

(The @ symbol and the name that follows is the person who posted the tip or aka Tweeted the tip)

@onyxhawke: Note to writers “never been done” is the death knell for any and all credibility you have for any fiction

@editrixanica: When your teen characters love music that you loved as a teen, they don’t seem retro-cool. They seem written by an old person. Sorry

@ArtemusDark: Write because it’s a part of you, not because you think there’s big $$$ in it.

@ArtemusDark The arts are heartbreaking because, curiously, suffering is what hones talent.

@ArtemusDark There are no hidden secrets to becoming a masterful writer; only reading and writing itself will make you one.

@andrewkarre: Accept all your tracked changes and hide all the comments before submitting a new manuscript.

@tor_intheory …one should never think there is an easy road to representation.

@andrewkarre: Accept all your tracked changes and hide all the comments before submitting a new manuscript. (Agents too!)

@URBookIsURHook Have you purchased the #domain names for your next #book? What are you waiting for??!!
@tor_intheory aka Victoria Marini – Don’t query me for a novel that my boss didn’t take on. I may have more time than her, but I want to build a different list.
@tor_intheory Neo-Agents are eager, hard working, and responsive, but it doesn’t mean we’ll take on projects that senior agents have turned down.
@JLDelbourgo aka Joelle Delbourgo – Choose 1 aspect of your novel to work on today in 1 chapter. Dialogue: Does it sound real? Is there enough? Too little? Repartee?
@DocumentDriven aka Janice Hussein – Copyediting tip–Between/ Among: Use Between when there are Two things or people; otherwise, use Among for more than two.
@TaherehMafi aka Tahereh Mafi – a good query letter is like a Venus Flytrap: alluring! intriguing! captivating enough to keep u from realizing u’ve just been eaten.
greyhausagency when sending a query, you have to tell me something about the book beyond the title, genre and word count.
@CherylRWrites aka Cheryl Reifsnyder – Spend energy on writing, not defending~
@BostonBookGirl aka Lauren E. MacLeod – Think before you type. If you write back to a rejection that agents hate writers I’m going to block you forever. Is that worth it?
@Theresa_Meyers aka Theresa Meyers – This is why the rights clauses in writing contracts R so critical! Author of Vampire Diaries series fired. http://on.io9.com/fSPVhH
And last, but not least, just because it’s funny…
@annagrace2009 aka Anna Grace – Had email today w/ a note to watch out for author who consistently spells his name wrong in his chapter. Learn to spell your name.
Also, here’s a link to one author’s thoughts on Should You Tweet http://jamigold.com/2011/02/should-you-tweet-cheat/
Have a great weekend everybody!
Contact me: iamwriting (at) oh(dot)rr(com)
p.s. To answer your question, Twitter did not pay me to do this post, hehe. 😀
Published in: on February 12, 2011 at 11:48 am  Comments (2)  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is:

Biographical criticism

An approach to literature which suggests that knowledge of the author’s life experiences can aid in the understanding of his or her work. While biographical information can sometimes complicate one’s interpretation of a work, and some formalist critics (such as the New Critics) disparage the use of the author’s biography as a tool for textual interpretation, learning about the life of the author can often enrich a reader’s appreciation for that author’s work.

Published in: on February 11, 2011 at 9:06 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is:
Free verse

Also called open form poetry, free verse refers to poems characterized by their nonconformity to established patterns of meter, rhyme, and stanza. Free verse uses elements such as speech patterns, grammar, emphasis, and breath pauses to decide line breaks, and usually does not rhyme.

Published in: on February 8, 2011 at 9:47 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is:

Didactic poetry

Poetry designed to teach an ethical, moral, or religious lesson. Michael Wigglesworth’s Puritan poem Day of Doom is an example of didactic poetry.

Published in: on February 7, 2011 at 8:43 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is:
Limerick

A light, humorous style of fixed form poetry. Its usual form consists of five lines with the rhyme scheme aabba; lines 1, 2, and 5 contain three feet, while lines 3 and 4 usually contain two feet. Limericks range in subject matter from the silly to the obscene, and since Edward Lear popularized them in the nineteenth century, children and adults have enjoyed these comic poems.

Published in: on February 2, 2011 at 10:39 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is: 

Character

Characterization A character is a person presented in a dramatic or narrative work, and characterization is the process by which a writer makes that character seem real to the reader. A hero or heroine, often called the protagonist, is the central character who engages the reader’s interest and empathy. The antagonist is the character, force, or collection of forces that stands directly opposed to the protagonist and gives rise to the conflict of the story. A static character does not change throughout the work, and the reader’s knowledge of that character does not grow, whereas a dynamic character undergoes some kind of change because of the action in the plot. A flat character embodies one or two qualities, ideas, or traits that can be readily described in a brief summary. They are not psychologically complex characters and therefore are readily accessible to readers. Some flat characters are recognized as stock characters; they embody stereotypes such as the “dumb blonde” or the “mean stepfather.” They become types rather than individuals. Round characters are more complex than flat or stock characters, and often display the inconsistencies and internal conflicts found in most real people. They are more fully developed, and therefore are harder to summarize. Authors have two major methods of presenting characters: showing and telling. Showing allows the author to present a character talking and acting, and lets the reader infer what kind of person the character is. In telling, the author intervenes to describe and sometimes evaluate the character for the reader. Characters can be convincing whether they are presented by showing or by telling, as long as their actions are motivated. Motivated action by the characters occurs when the reader or audience is offered reasons for how the characters behave, what they say, and the decisions they make. Plausible action is action by a character in a story that seems reasonable, given the motivations presented.

Published in: on January 21, 2011 at 10:03 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is: Irony

A literary device that uses contradictory statements or situations to reveal a reality different from what appears to be true. It is ironic for a firehouse to burn down, or for a police station to be burglarized. Verbal irony is a figure of speech that occurs when a person says one thing but means the opposite. Sarcasm is a strong form of verbal irony that is calculated to hurt someone through, for example, false praise. Dramatic irony creates a discrepancy between what a character believes or says and what the reader or audience member knows to be true. Tragic irony is a form of dramatic irony found in tragedies such as Oedipus the King, in which Oedipus searches for the person responsible for the plague that ravishes his city and ironically ends up hunting himself. Situational irony exists when there is an incongruity between what is expected to happen and what actually happens due to forces beyond human comprehension or control. The suicide of the seemingly successful main character in Edwin Arlington Robinson’s poem “Richard Cory” is an example of situational irony. Cosmic irony occurs when a writer uses God, destiny, or fate to dash the hopes and expectations of a character or of humankind in general. In cosmic irony, a discrepancy exists between what a character aspires to and what universal forces provide. Stephen Crane’s poem “A Man Said to the Universe” is a good example of cosmic irony, because the universe acknowledges no obligation to the man’s assertion of his own existence.

Published in: on January 18, 2011 at 3:33 pm  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is: Metaphor

A metaphor is a figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things, without using the word like or as. Metaphors assert the identity of dissimilar things, as when Macbeth asserts that life is a “brief candle.” Metaphors can be subtle and powerful, and can transform people, places, objects, and ideas into whatever the writer imagines them to be. An implied metaphor is a more subtle comparison; the terms being compared are not so specifically explained. For example, to describe a stubborn man unwilling to leave, one could say that he was “a mule standing his ground.” This is a fairly explicit metaphor; the man is being compared to a mule. But to say that the man “brayed his refusal to leave” is to create an implied metaphor, because the subject (the man) is never overtly identified as a mule. Braying is associated with the mule, a notoriously stubborn creature, and so the comparison between the stubborn man and the mule is sustained. Implied metaphors can slip by inattentive readers who are not sensitive to such carefully chosen, highly concentrated language. An extended metaphor is a sustained comparison in which part or all of a poem consists of a series of related metaphors. Robert Francis’s poem “Catch” relies on an extended metaphor that compares poetry to playing catch. A controlling metaphor runs through an entire work and determines the form or nature of that work. The controlling metaphor in Anne Bradstreet’s poem “The Author to Her Book” likens her book to a child. Synecdoche is a kind of metaphor in which a part of something is used to signify the whole, as when a gossip is called a “wagging tongue,” or when ten ships are called “ten sails.” Sometimes, synecdoche refers to the whole being used to signify the part, as in the phrase “Boston won the baseball game.” Clearly, the entire city of Boston did not participate in the game; the whole of Boston is being used to signify the individuals who played and won the game. Metonymy is a type of metaphor in which something closely associated with a subject is substituted for it. In this way, we speak of the “silver screen” to mean motion pictures, “the crown” to stand for the king, “the White House” to stand for the activities of the president.

Published in: on January 17, 2011 at 10:39 am  Leave a Comment  

When submitting your query…

Thought I’d pass on a little to my readers. This post is along the same lines of  ‘Agent Pet Peeves’. This is information that can help us all when writing query letters. These comes from blog posts, Twitter tweets, etc. I hope they help you.
Don’t include chapter count.
Be careful on who you compare yourself with.

Published in: on January 5, 2011 at 12:18 pm  Leave a Comment