Writing Picture Prompt

Be sure to visit my other helpful pages for writers; Literary Lingo , Writing Picture Prompts and Words of the Day!

Advertisements
Published in: on February 4, 2011 at 12:34 pm  Leave a Comment  

Writing Picture Prompt

 

 

Be sure to visit my other helpful pages for writers; Literary Lingo , Writing Picture Prompts and Words of the Day!

Published in: on February 3, 2011 at 9:13 am  Leave a Comment  

Writing Picture Prompt

Combine the images to form an idea for a story.

Be sure to visit my other helpful pages for writers; Literary Lingo , Writing Picture Prompts and Words of the Day!

Published in: on February 2, 2011 at 10:38 am  Leave a Comment  

Writing Picture Prompt

Be sure to visit my other helpful pages for writers; Literary Lingo , Writing Picture Prompts and Words of the Day!

Published in: on February 1, 2011 at 11:53 am  Leave a Comment  

Writing Picture Prompt

Use the following images to form a story.

Be sure to visit my other helpful pages for writers; Literary Lingo , Writing Picture Prompts and Words of the Day!

Published in: on January 28, 2011 at 8:26 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is:

Aesthetic distance

degree of emotional involvement in a work of art. The most obvious example of aesthetic distance (also referred to simply as distance) occurs with paintings. Some paintings require us to stand back to see the design of the whole painting; standing close, we see the technique of the painting, say the brush strokes, but not the whole. Other paintings require us to stand close to see the whole; their design and any figures become less clear as we move back from the painting.

Published in: on January 26, 2011 at 9:30 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is: 

Character

Characterization A character is a person presented in a dramatic or narrative work, and characterization is the process by which a writer makes that character seem real to the reader. A hero or heroine, often called the protagonist, is the central character who engages the reader’s interest and empathy. The antagonist is the character, force, or collection of forces that stands directly opposed to the protagonist and gives rise to the conflict of the story. A static character does not change throughout the work, and the reader’s knowledge of that character does not grow, whereas a dynamic character undergoes some kind of change because of the action in the plot. A flat character embodies one or two qualities, ideas, or traits that can be readily described in a brief summary. They are not psychologically complex characters and therefore are readily accessible to readers. Some flat characters are recognized as stock characters; they embody stereotypes such as the “dumb blonde” or the “mean stepfather.” They become types rather than individuals. Round characters are more complex than flat or stock characters, and often display the inconsistencies and internal conflicts found in most real people. They are more fully developed, and therefore are harder to summarize. Authors have two major methods of presenting characters: showing and telling. Showing allows the author to present a character talking and acting, and lets the reader infer what kind of person the character is. In telling, the author intervenes to describe and sometimes evaluate the character for the reader. Characters can be convincing whether they are presented by showing or by telling, as long as their actions are motivated. Motivated action by the characters occurs when the reader or audience is offered reasons for how the characters behave, what they say, and the decisions they make. Plausible action is action by a character in a story that seems reasonable, given the motivations presented.

Published in: on January 21, 2011 at 10:03 am  Leave a Comment  

Writing Picture Prompt

Published in: on January 12, 2011 at 8:25 am  Leave a Comment  

Literary Lingo

It’s time for some Literary Lingo.

Today’s word is:  Allegory

A figurative work in which a surface narrative carries a secondary, symbolic or metaphorical meaning. In The Faerie Queene, for example, Red Cross Knight is a heroic knight in the literal narrative, but also a figure representing Everyman in the Christian journey.  Many works contain allegories or are allegorical in part, but not many are entirely allegorical.

Published in: on January 5, 2011 at 10:08 am  Leave a Comment  

Writing Picture Prompt

Be sure to visit my other helpful pages for writers; Literary Lingo , Writing Picture Prompts and Words of the Day!

Published in: on December 28, 2010 at 10:07 am  Leave a Comment